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Resume Tips for Applying to a Job When You’re Overqualified

by Heather Rothbauer-Wanish, Freelance Writer on June 26th, 2018

At some point during your career, you may be applying for a job and you will discover that you are considered overqualified. It may be a job that you would LOVE to secure, but you are concerned that if you include your backgrounds, skills, education, and work history, the potential employer will no give you a second-look because you may be too bored, want too much money, or don’t really want the position.

Tip #1 –  Don’t include advanced degrees on your resume if they aren’t relevant. In the past, I worked with a client who had a law degree, but his entire professional career had been spent in sales and that’s where he wanted to remain. So, we only mentioned his undergraduate degree and focused on his sales and marketing skills—leaving off the fact that he was a lawyer.

Tip #2 – Choose the job history that aligns with the future job opportunity. If you have worked for 15 or 20 years, you likely may have older positions that aren’t relatable to the future of your career. Instead, only include the positions that are in-line with your career direction and use a heading that says Selected Professional Experience or Relevant Work History.

Tip #3 – Be specific with your skills. Instead of touting high-level skills that have nothing to do with your goals, eliminate these and really concentrate on the key words and qualifications that are listed in the job posting. By changing your skills and career summary each time you send your resume, you are also much more likely to get through Applicant Tracking Systems.

Tip #4 – Use a career summary that highlights why you are the right person for the job and why this job may be for you. Mention your passion for the field or a past accomplishment that directly aligns with this job opening. Show them why you are the right person for the position and why they should call you for an interview.

Remember, if you are already applying for a job and sending a resume, the company should understand that you are interested in the opportunity. However, it also doesn’t hurt to ensure that your resume aligns with that perception, too.

If you still have questions, please contact me today and I can review your resume – I look forward to  hearing from you!

From → Job Hunting, Resume

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