Should I Hire a Professional Resume Writer?

So often in life, we try to ‘get by’ with doing things ourselves. Whether it is making birthday decorations for your child’s party, painting your kitchen, or landscaping your yard, we are always looking for ways to save money, maximize resources, and take pride in work we completed ourselves.

However, have you ever thought that doing all of these things can actually COST you in the long-run? Hiring a professional resume writer may be one of those instances. Read further to discover WHY you may want to hire a professional when designing your new resume.

Consideration #1 – It’s challenging to write about yourself. No matter how objective you are as a person, it’s almost impossible to be objective about yourself. And, a good resume writer can assist you with extracting information you didn’t consider; the writer can help you identify your strengths, focus on accomplishment, and write about your skills in a way that makes an impact.

Consideration #2 – Do you know the latest formats and technology? If you haven’t written a resume in 15+ years, everything has changed. You will need to know the correct key words to include, formats that work with Applicant Tracking, and what should and should not be included on your resume. For example, if you are still including an Objective or the line, ‘References Available Upon Request,’ we should chat NOW. Neither of those are typical on today’s resumes.

Consideration #3 – You are losing money every day you don’t have a job. Or, you may continue to be miserable at a job that you DESPISE. So, yes, a professional resume writer will cost you money; however, I see it as an investment. If you pay someone else $300 or $500 to write your resume and you get a job within four weeks, think how much money you are saving by landing a job sooner. As an alternative, you can continue to stare at your resume and try to figure out how to change things for three months and not have one interview.

As someone who truly enjoys doing things for myself, there are things that I have now outsourced to others. After reviewing how much time it takes me to do those things, I realize that it makes more sense financially (and lifestyle-wise), for me to hire others to complete the tasks that I don’t enjoy the most.

For example, I hired someone to clean my house twice per month. Instead of me worrying about how I’m going to find the time to clean while work piles up on my desk, I look forward to those two days that someone else takes care of the deep clean. And, while that is happening, I can finish work projects and focus on helping others.

If you are ready to outsource your resume project and want to move forward, contact me today! And, if you prefer to complete your own document, download this PDF that will provide you with key words, skills, and examples that will help you as you develop your new resume!

How to Not Appear Old with Your Education on Your Resume

As you get older, it gets a bit more difficult to ‘figure-out’ how to include Education on your resume. Do you list high school or not? What if you went to college but didn’t graduate? Should you include the years of attendance and graduation? These are all things to consider when working with this portion of your document. Read below for some tips and ideas on how to include the “correct” information without appearing “old.”

Tip #1 – Don’t add years. That is right. The year you graduated college is not important. And, at some point, the year you graduated may start to date you and open you to age discrimination. If you know someone graduated from college in 1988, you may automatically think that he or she is out-of-date when it comes to today’s workplace. So, why put that information out there?

Tip #2 – List your major and your minor. Don’t just say that you earned a “Bachelor of Arts” degree—instead, state that you earned a degree in Chemistry or Marketing with a minor in History or Public Relations. This is the type of information that will be most applicable to your future job. Keep in mind that it is not necessary to include all of the classes you took or your GPA. And, be sure to list the name of the college from which you earned your degree.

Tip #3 – Don’t list EVERYTHING associated with your education. What does this mean? This simply means that you don’t have to list all of the clubs, sororities, or organizations you were involved with during your college career. Now, if you only graduated from college three weeks ago and have ZERO professional experience, you may want to consider adding your extracurricular activities to emphasize collaboration, leadership, and a focus within your desired work area. Otherwise, if you were a member of a fraternity from 1988-1992, it’s probably not vital that it ends up on your resume.

Tip #4 – Coursework but no degree? Here’s what to do. If you attended college for some time, but didn’t get a degree, then list it like the following, “Coursework – Accounting, ABC University.” Or, as an alternative, you could list the number of credits you earned towards the degree. And, if you have any sort of college education, there is no need to list high school education.

Still not sure how to list your unique educational experience? Email me at heather@feather-communications.com and I can offer you a free resume review.

If you want MORE resume tips, then download my free Top 5 Resume Tips to GET THE INTERVIEW.

5 Common Resume Mistakes

As someone who has written resumes for clients since 2008, I like to think that I have seen it all. From someone putting their marriage status and number of kids on a resume to listing your graduation date of 1975, there are some things that USED to be acceptable on a resume that no longer are. Check-out my list of the most common resume mistakes that I see and how to fix them.

Mistake #1 – Using an Objective. Don’t do it. To be honest, no one cares that you want to “…further your career through a full-time position.”  Instead, tell the company your attributes through a carefully crafted career summary and eliminate what is in it for you. It’s all about the company and how you can assist the organization.

Mistake #2 – Focusing on Your Job Description. While you can definitely use your job description as a basis for your resume and professional history, it’s important that you discuss your accomplishments and not just your responsibilities. And, frankly, there are most likely a lot of other people out there who also have similar job descriptions. What did you achieve for the organization and how did you help them grow, prosper, and make an impact within the market? Focus on THAT.

Mistake #3 – Too Much Information. It’s awesome that you earned a varsity letter in high school for forensics; however, if that was 10 years ago, then it is no longer relevant. Don’t put too much information in your resume—especially if that information clouds what is most relevant. Instead, focus on the last 10-15 years of your job history and how that is relative to the position you are seeking.

Mistake #4 – Not Enough Information. While it is bad to include too much information, it’s also important to highlight your skills and not short-change yourself. I’ve worked with many clients who think they “only” do this or that. Or, they use the word “just” to describe their work history. Be sure that you are really highlighting what you did and what you achieved—don’t minimize yourself.

Mistake #5 – Using General and Non-Specific Words. When you are writing your resume, it is vital that you are specific and concrete with information. Consider the difference of mentioning that you “…increased sales” versus “…enhanced profitability by $100K within 90 days.”

Most importantly, be sure that you have someone else review your resume and provide feedback. Too often, we cannot see our own mistakes and may miss errors. If you want me to be that second set-of-eyes for you, email me today and I’ll provide you with a free resume review!

Following-Up After a Job Interview

So, you have had a terrific job interview and you REALLY want the job. But, you want to make sure that you don’t appear desperate or annoying as you follow-up on the job opportunity. However, it is VERY important that you continue to maintain contact with the organization and let the company know that you are still interested. Read below for tips and ideas about how to approach the technique of follow-up in a proper and professional manner.

Idea #1 – Send an email. Yes, email is important because it is quick and effective. You can even send it the same day as the interview and ensure that all interviewers are copied with the same information. This is especially effective when there are numerous interviewers and you want all of them to receive the same appreciation.

Idea #2 – Send a handwritten thank-you card. This may seem old-fashioned, but there is something about a card received in the mail that makes an impact. In fact, because most people don’t do this, it provides a great opportunity for you to stand-out from the crowd.

Idea #3 – Call the employer. If it’s been a week or longer since your interview and you have followed-up in written form, it’s perfectly fine to call the employer and/or lead interviewer to discover where the company is within the hiring process.

Idea #4 – Maintain connections. Even if you end up not getting the new job opportunity, maintain contact with the company and be sure that you don’t ruin or sabotage relationships. If the company hires someone else and it doesn’t work out, they may turn to you as the next employee. If you have ever heard the saying, “Don’t burn bridges,” – that would apply here.

As you continue your job search, just be aware that follow-up is key to the job search. Don’t go to the interview and just “wait” to hear from the company. While you don’t want to be annoying (hint: don’t call every day after your interview), you can demonstrate your interest in the job and let the company know that you are ready, willing, and able to work for them.

Ready to learn more about job searching, resumes, and interviewing? Contact me TODAY for a free resume review and discussion about how we can work together!

5 Tips for Rejecting a Job Offer

You THINK you have found your dream job and perhaps even enjoyed meeting the company personnel and thought the interview went well. Then, you receive a job offer and find out one of the following: the job isn’t what you thought it was, the pay doesn’t match your needs, or the position requires way too much travel for your current situation. Now, you have to reject the job offer – read below for five tips on how to correctly do so.

Tip #1 – Actually reject the offer. Sometimes people are so worried about saying “no” that they do nothing. This is definitely NOT the correct course of action. You have to follow-through with the entire hiring process, even if you decide you do not want the position.

Tip #2 – Put it in writing. Send an email and document the rejection of the offer. It’s important that there is a record of declining the position. And, if you would like to, you can also send a hard copy via mail.

Tip #3 – Use the “I appreciate you” sandwich. This looks like the following: thank the company and personnel for the time spent interviewing you and for considering you for the open position (positive). Then, state that you have decided to decline the offer (negative). Finally, end the documentation with another thank you and appreciation statement (positive). This allows you to have the order of thank you—bad news—thank you.

Tip #4 – Be concise. While it is important to state the rejection, it’s not necessary to elaborate on WHY you are declining the offer. Keep it simple and concise. If you feel that a ‘reason’ is a necessity, then just state that circumstances have changed or that the position isn’t the right fit at this time.

Tip #5 – Maintain open communication. It’s vital that you preserve this potential relationship. After all, the company may decide to re-offer the position in the future and offer you more money or exactly what you need to make a move. Do you want to be considered at that point? If so, then be sure that you are always professional and never bad-mouth the employer.

Finally, remember that just because one opportunity doesn’t work out, it doesn’t mean that you can’t still be positive about your job search and use that past experience as you move forward. There is something about knowing even more people and understanding more companies that allows you to build your network and enhance communication within your field. Use that information to your advantage and keep going—you WILL find the appropriate position if you don’t stop looking.

Ready to make a career move and not sure how your resume will work in today’s job market? Contact me today for a free resume review!

How to Sell Yourself on Your Resume

For most people, it can be awkward and strange to write about yourself, especially when you are highlighting your best qualities and trying to ‘sell’ yourself to land that next job opportunity. But, the truth is, you MUST do it correctly if you expect to get a call for an interview. More importantly, you need to stop thinking that it is bragging or being boastful. If what you are writing is true, there is absolutely no reason to feel guilty about writing it in words.

Tip #1 – Change your mindset. Instead of thinking about what YOU consider to be your strengths, think about how your co-workers would describe you or what your boss would say about you. If you have kept your past performance appraisals and reviews, pull those out and review the information. Chances are, your employer has said good things about you; this can put you in the correct mindset as you are starting to craft your document.

Tip #2 – Focus on your accomplishments. Instead of just looking at your job description (which probably sounds a bit boring and dry), think about what you have contributed to the workplace and why that matters. Use quantitative information—including numbers, dollar amounts, and percentages—to show the IMPACT you have made at the organization.

Tip #3 – Do your research. Review the job posting and the potential employer. Be sure that you are making your resume in-line with their verbiage, tone, and organization. It’s vital that you align with the key words in the job posting and understand the culture of the company.

Tip #4 – Don’t sell yourself short. Don’t just put one or two lines underneath each job description and then think that is enough. Instead, really think about what you did at each position and make sure that you are adequately representing your achievements in these roles.

Tip #5 – Identify transferable skills and strengths. Often, people are changing industries and find it challenging to discover how what they have done in the past translates to the future jobs. However, if you dig a little deeper, you will most likely find that working with cross-functional team members, overseeing projects, and collaborating with vendors may be skills utilized in both positions.

Finally, whether or not you know it, you are selling yourself all of the time. Building a resume is no different – it’s just selling yourself in words. If you are still concerned that your resume isn’t impactful enough or isn’t ready for today’s job market, contact me today for a free resume review!