For most people, it can be awkward and strange to write about yourself, especially when you are highlighting your best qualities and trying to ‘sell’ yourself to land that next job opportunity. But, the truth is, you MUST do it correctly if you expect to get a call for an interview. More importantly, you need to stop thinking that it is bragging or being boastful. If what you are writing is true, there is absolutely no reason to feel guilty about writing it in words.

Tip #1 – Change your mindset. Instead of thinking about what YOU consider to be your strengths, think about how your co-workers would describe you or what your boss would say about you. If you have kept your past performance appraisals and reviews, pull those out and review the information. Chances are, your employer has said good things about you; this can put you in the correct mindset as you are starting to craft your document.

Tip #2 – Focus on your accomplishments. Instead of just looking at your job description (which probably sounds a bit boring and dry), think about what you have contributed to the workplace and why that matters. Use quantitative information—including numbers, dollar amounts, and percentages—to show the IMPACT you have made at the organization.

Tip #3 – Do your research. Review the job posting and the potential employer. Be sure that you are making your resume in-line with their verbiage, tone, and organization. It’s vital that you align with the key words in the job posting and understand the culture of the company.

Tip #4 – Don’t sell yourself short. Don’t just put one or two lines underneath each job description and then think that is enough. Instead, really think about what you did at each position and make sure that you are adequately representing your achievements in these roles.

Tip #5 – Identify transferable skills and strengths. Often, people are changing industries and find it challenging to discover how what they have done in the past translates to the future jobs. However, if you dig a little deeper, you will most likely find that working with cross-functional team members, overseeing projects, and collaborating with vendors may be skills utilized in both positions.

Finally, whether or not you know it, you are selling yourself all of the time. Building a resume is no different – it’s just selling yourself in words. If you are still concerned that your resume isn’t impactful enough or isn’t ready for today’s job market, contact me today for a free resume review!