As someone who has written resumes for clients since 2008, I like to think that I have seen it all. From someone putting their marriage status and number of kids on a resume to listing your graduation date of 1975, there are some things that USED to be acceptable on a resume that no longer are. Check-out my list of the most common resume mistakes that I see and how to fix them.

Mistake #1 – Using an Objective. Don’t do it. To be honest, no one cares that you want to “…further your career through a full-time position.”  Instead, tell the company your attributes through a carefully crafted career summary and eliminate what is in it for you. It’s all about the company and how you can assist the organization.

Mistake #2 – Focusing on Your Job Description. While you can definitely use your job description as a basis for your resume and professional history, it’s important that you discuss your accomplishments and not just your responsibilities. And, frankly, there are most likely a lot of other people out there who also have similar job descriptions. What did you achieve for the organization and how did you help them grow, prosper, and make an impact within the market? Focus on THAT.

Mistake #3 – Too Much Information. It’s awesome that you earned a varsity letter in high school for forensics; however, if that was 10 years ago, then it is no longer relevant. Don’t put too much information in your resume—especially if that information clouds what is most relevant. Instead, focus on the last 10-15 years of your job history and how that is relative to the position you are seeking.

Mistake #4 – Not Enough Information. While it is bad to include too much information, it’s also important to highlight your skills and not short-change yourself. I’ve worked with many clients who think they “only” do this or that. Or, they use the word “just” to describe their work history. Be sure that you are really highlighting what you did and what you achieved—don’t minimize yourself.

Mistake #5 – Using General and Non-Specific Words. When you are writing your resume, it is vital that you are specific and concrete with information. Consider the difference of mentioning that you “…increased sales” versus “…enhanced profitability by $100K within 90 days.”

Most importantly, be sure that you have someone else review your resume and provide feedback. Too often, we cannot see our own mistakes and may miss errors. If you want me to be that second set-of-eyes for you, email me today and I’ll provide you with a free resume review!